River flows and lake levels

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
With levels in the lower great lakes still at record levels this isn't necessarily the best news. Doesn't look like we'll be seeing any relief in the short term! The lack of ice cover during these mild winters generally allows for accelerated evaporation. Doesn't seem like that will be enough to offset the incoming water this season tho....


Josh
 

bassaholic

Well-Known Member
IMO this is going to be sustained if not get worse in the years to come. I feel for those with water front cottages and homes
 

Kirby

Active Member
It’s cycle it comes and it goes. 20 years ago we were digging our channels because the water was so low. Although it may be on the rise still eventually it will fall and the cycle will repeat itself again. It’s Mother Nature way of cleaning
 

bassaholic

Well-Known Member
It’s cycle it comes and it goes. 20 years ago we were digging our channels because the water was so low. Although it may be on the rise still eventually it will fall and the cycle will repeat itself again. It’s Mother Nature way of cleaning
True but the swings are far more drastic than 20yrs ago
 

Old Cut LongPointer

Well-Known Member
Yup ! Mother Nature is a bit fickled when it comes to her moods, 20 year mood or 100 year mood or 1000 or 10,000 year mood . She's been around from the start and will be here in the end. As for data regarding flows and levels ? I know U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers keeps records as does Environment Canada. I recall they had a realtime data for local creeks and rivers probably handy for steelheaders ? As for those cottagers at Long Point and such … they are in for a wet year. I would stock up on sandbags and/or some other kind of flood prevention not to mention a Bug Out Plan.
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
The flow charts available in both the US and Canada makes things almost too easy for Steelheaders. Few things have had an impact on the sport over the last 20yrs like the flow charts IMO. Guessing river levels is a thing of the past. TBH its one thing I'd like to see disappear......too many anglers sitting at home watching the charts then pounding the rivers just as they recede to perfect levels. The efficiency of today's average river angler far exceeds those of decades ago and that's not a good thing for the fish!

Josh
 

G.Mech

Well-Known Member
It’s cycle it comes and it goes. 20 years ago we were digging our channels because the water was so low. Although it may be on the rise still eventually it will fall and the cycle will repeat itself again. It’s Mother Nature way of cleaning
It wasn't even that long ago....2013 saw the lowest water levels on record especially in L. Huron & Michigan. Lots of places were high and dry. Hopefully the current levels recede this year with the minimal ice and snow and we can have a few years of average levels.

Remember this:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/lake-huron-lake-michigan-hit-lowest-water-levels-on-record-1.1380357
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
The levels are gonna continue to rise this year by the look of it. Lake Superior is still near record levels and that means lots of water flowing downstream for the foreseeable futuret.

Anyone remember the huge campaign called 'Stop The Drop' that pointed the fingers in all directions for the critically low water levels :D

Josh
 

G.Mech

Well-Known Member
The levels are gonna continue to rise this year by the look of it. Lake Superior is still near record levels and that means lots of water flowing downstream for the foreseeable futuret.

Anyone remember the huge campaign called 'Stop The Drop' that pointed the fingers in all directions for the critically low water levels :D

Josh
Do you have any information on how much water enters the lower lakes from Superior vs runoff from all the tributaries in the Huron-Michigan-Erie watersheds? I'd have to think the inflow from Superior would be minimal compared to all the other inflows from the watersheds wouldn't it? We have relatively little snow even up on the northern end of Huron so would that not suggest we should see a drop in levels unless we have a very wet spring? I really don't know.....
 

Wave Runner

Well-Known Member
Yes when the Great Lakes water levels were unusually low from approximately 2000 through 2012 or so, this was pointed to as evidence by the environmental alarmists that global warming was causing the Great Lakes to dry up. Saying if extreme action wasn't taken immediately the Great Lakes water supply to tens of millions of people would be forever threatened. Now ironically less than a decade later they contribute the cause of the high water levels to, well you guessed it climate change. Trudeau has the perfect solution however... more carbon tax will control the weather. :rolleyes:
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
Do you have any information on how much water enters the lower lakes from Superior vs runoff from all the tributaries in the Huron-Michigan-Erie watersheds? I'd have to think the inflow from Superior would be minimal compared to all the other inflows from the watersheds wouldn't it? We have relatively little snow even up on the northern end of Huron so would that not suggest we should see a drop in levels unless we have a very wet spring? I really don't know.....
Well the fact that alot of rivers have had a year's worth of precipitation in 4 months means the lakes also got a year's worth of precipitation in 4 months. Snow pack can hold some water but 20" of snow. Is only equivalent to 2" of rain, not a big deal in the overall scheme of things.

The St Marys River in the Soo is equal to well over 1/3 of the flow of the Niagara river right now and they've dialed back the flow big time in the last month ;)

Screenshot_20200214-115534_Samsung Internet.jpgScreenshot_20200214-115617_Samsung Internet.jpg

Josh
 
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