musky in Erie

konrad67

Well-Known Member
--there have been more muskellunge landed in or about the Long point area than at any other time in recent memory---I'm looking into seeing if these fish are roamers from St.Clair or possibly resident fish (that may be genetically from that area) that have established themselves in---would appreciate any feedback from other anglers related to musky they may have landed by happenstance or intentionally targeted-- no need to divulge your spots -but I am curious what depths and if there is any changes from summer to fall hunting grounds--I am very interested on their primary forage in this part of the lake--if they are following schools or perch or another main forage base.---
Thank you
 

lazywave

Well-Known Member
I’m by no means saying the Muskie in long point bay are roamers. But it’s been proven that Muskie move more then we think. One satellite tagged Muskie went from Detroit river to Buffalo Harbor and then back to Lake Saint Claire and was last seen somewhere in Erie

 

scribe

Well-Known Member
A few years ago I caught one six inches long. There is no proof a fish that small hatched in the bay, but it's a long way to the Niagara River for a six-inch fish. . . .
 

konrad67

Well-Known Member
A few years ago I caught one six inches long. There is no proof a fish that small hatched in the bay, but it's a long way to the Niagara River for a six-inch fish. . . .
That is a very important piece of information--a 6 inch fry like that would have to have come from that location- and obviously hatched there---about 8 years ago in Rondeau Bay they musky fishing was on fire for one season and then the following years completely ended--
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
There's definitely spawning happening in the bay. Not sure how you would define or determine how 'resident' a fish is tho. The chances of adults living the entire season in the inner bay are slim. Some may roam the general area of the outer bay year round but a majority would simply be wanderers.

Josh
 
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Bay_Fishing

Well-Known Member
They are definitely around. With the amount of pike around I think we would see more tiger muskie if there spawning around the bay, the food source is there and timing is everything. But there are definitely some resident skis around the bay and and surrounding area.
 

jerk bait

Well-Known Member
According to a study done a few years back the muskie in and around the bay are migrant from the niagra river strain. Apparently they can tell st Clair strain from niagra river. The evidence was a couple of tagged ski from the upper Niagara were caught in the bay. I asked about reproduction and they claim there is zero evidence of musky spawning in the bay. I find this a bit hard to believe as I have caught a few hammer handle size musky bass fishing in the last few years. Could a 2 pound musky make it from the upper niagra down? Keep in mind this was a university study by co op students working for the MNR My nephew was among them. It was interesting to see the net results from the bay at different times of the year etc. I will ask him again but I recall there were 0 newbie musky taken in the keel nets. This was a few years ago, iam going to see if he still has his notes.
 

Real Therapy

Well-Known Member
I started targeting them trolling and in a number of outings caught 9 with the largest being 28 lbs. 20 ft of water between Turkey point and Normandale.Also caught a number of walleye to 7 lbs and big pike. This is a new fishery and not just incidental catches as I was specifically fishing for them .The walleye were bonus fish and I was a bit surprised they were hitting the large baits.
There is also a newer Laker fishery in the spring May and June ,We had many double digit days this past spring but it's a short window.
 

Fishaholic

Well-Known Member
Caught a small 5-6 " muskie in one of the channels when I was spring crappie fishing a couple of years ago, so there is definitely some reproduction going on inside of the bay.

Regards
KJ
 

Blastr

Well-Known Member
Site Sponsor
--there have been more muskellunge landed in or about the Long point area than at any other time in recent memory---I'm looking into seeing if these fish are roamers from St.Clair or possibly resident fish (that may be genetically from that area) that have established themselves in---would appreciate any feedback from other anglers related to musky they may have landed by happenstance or intentionally targeted-- no need to divulge your spots -but I am curious what depths and if there is any changes from summer to fall hunting grounds--I am very interested on their primary forage in this part of the lake--if they are following schools or perch or another main forage base.---
Thank you
I believe the skis follow the big schools of bait. I've seen more ski's in that area as well. good luck,
 

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konrad67

Well-Known Member
I started targeting them trolling and in a number of outings caught 9 with the largest being 28 lbs. 20 ft of water between Turkey point and Normandale.Also caught a number of walleye to 7 lbs and big pike. This is a new fishery and not just incidental catches as I was specifically fishing for them .The walleye were bonus fish and I was a bit surprised they were hitting the large baits.
There is also a newer Laker fishery in the spring May and June ,We had many double digit days this past spring but it's a short window.
This is why I posed this question--"Is it a temporary fluke fishery or is it a new beginning of a fledgling self sustaining fishery that will offer up new opportunities for local anglers?" From opinions and some other information I have gathered -I believe this very well could grow into a self sustaining trophy fishery in the very near future-
 

jerk bait

Well-Known Member
This is why I posed this question--"Is it a temporary fluke fishery or is it a new beginning of a fledgling self sustaining fishery that will offer up new opportunities for local anglers?" From opinions and some other information I have gathered -I believe this very well could grow into a self sustaining trophy fishery in the very near future-
Well from the MNR study they dont reproduce in long point area and the tagged fish were originally from the niagara river area but....like stated above we have see. Small musky roaming around. Where did these come from if they are not reproducing. The lake is definitely changing
 

F7Firecat

Member
I started targeting them trolling and in a number of outings caught 9 with the largest being 28 lbs. 20 ft of water between Turkey point and Normandale.Also caught a number of walleye to 7 lbs and big pike. This is a new fishery and not just incidental catches as I was specifically fishing for them .The walleye were bonus fish and I was a bit surprised they were hitting the large baits.
There is also a newer Laker fishery in the spring May and June ,We had many double digit days this past spring but it's a short window.
Real Therapy,

Can you post a picture of that 28lber?

I would think that by looking at the markings we should be able to tell what strain it might be, as Niagara River fish will look different than St Clair fish.

txs

F7
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
Real Therapy,

Can you post a picture of that 28lber?

I would think that by looking at the markings we should be able to tell what strain it might be, as Niagara River fish will look different than St Clair fish.

txs

F7
I'd be very intererested in hearing how you can visually differentiate between a St. Clair fish and a Niagara fish. Both primarily produce spotted phase fish that look incredibly similar in my experience.

Josh
 

jerk bait

Well-Known Member
They are noticeably different especially in spot pattern and base clour phase. St Clair musky are unique. I have muskie fished all over Ontario and never saw a same pattern. Lake of woods and the French each produce different phases.
I'd be very intererested in hearing how you can visually differentiate between a St. Clair fish and a Niagara fish. Both primarily produce spotted phase fish that look incredibly similar in my experience.

Josh
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
I've fished all over as well and I agree that some areas have unique patterns and colour phases which can give clues as to origin. I don't however see a distinct difference between St Clair and Niagara fish. Both are generally a light creamy colour with light spotting on mature fish. And both will see darker juvenile spotting on fish up to around 40" due to fast growth rates.

Josh
 

jerk bait

Well-Known Member
St Clair must once over 24 inch or so have a distinct phase. They look a bit like other great lake ski but experienced guys and charter guys can tell the difference. Iam not a muskie pro but I can tell you a st Clair musky from any other part of Ontario as I can for a french river ski. I agree the small ones are harder to tell
 
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