Hunting Kayak

PlanB

Well-Known Member
Looking for some advice on a hunting kayak, will be my first kayak! I’m 6’ about 165 lbs, no dog, float hunting mostly small to medium size rivers. Most likely get to LPB, LSC at least a couple times a year so will need decoy space. i‘ve done a bunch or research online but looking for some real world advise. Main question is 10 or 12 feet long. Like the 12 for storage space, like the 10 for transport. Wondering if anyone has experience with either or both sizes for hunting? Thank in advance for any feedback.
 

fish_for_life

Well-Known Member
Site Sponsor
Personally I would go for the 12 ft. More space , more stable to get in and out of , great for fishing as well. The tens are great for little floats but not much room for gear. If you like the lighter kayak and need space you can tow a jet sled behind for decoys. They are great !
 

PlanB

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the response, makes sense, I’m leaning toward the 12 footer. Might be more versatile in the long run!
 

Tundra Swan

Well-Known Member
Hello Plan B,

I bought a Wilderness Systems 12 foot Pungo (sand color) in 1996 for hunting at Presqu'ile Provincial Park from 1996 to 2003 ... a wise choice.

I moved to Port Rowan in 2004 and have used it to visit every blind and shooting point within A Zone (including the 5 blinds in Big Creek) at Long Point ... hunting at several of them with it ... no problems.

I could easily carry 8 regular mallard decoys and 4 tipper mallard decoys along with all of my regular gear without any problems.

Jerome

PS I have also used it to hunt B Zone near shore.
 

PlanB

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the input. I do a lot of drift river hunting in a canoe with a buddy. Put in at one bridge out at another downstream. Want to do this solo with the kayak that’s why I was kinda considering the 10 footer, no decoys required. Any thoughts on the maneuverability of a 12 on small to medium rivers?
 

fish_for_life

Well-Known Member
Site Sponsor
Thanks for the input. I do a lot of drift river hunting in a canoe with a buddy. Put in at one bridge out at another downstream. Want to do this solo with the kayak that’s why I was kinda considering the 10 footer, no decoys required. Any thoughts on the maneuverability of a 12 on small to medium rivers?
I use my 12’ on many creeks and rivers. Never had a problem. They maneuver better than a canoe. But any log jam can be a night mare.
 

nutsmith

New Member
I spent two years hunting with an Ascent H12 from Bass Pro before I got a dog and would recommend it highly with some provisos. I bought mine for $600 used and they can go significantly cheaper than that. (Matter of fact, mine's probably for sale. Which isn't why I'm recommending it.) They're super stable and have a ton of room for gear and decoys. I routinely brought out 24 decoys in mine. They're also bullet proof: the hulls are tough. As for a blind, I put the Yak blind on it, and it worked well, though without the flaps, which just got in the way when chasing cripples. It was a nice boat to just slip into some reeds and hunt out of. It was also surprisingly comfortable. I'm a big guy, 6'3" and it worked well for my frame.
The downsides are the boats weigh a ton, somewhere around 80lbs, so heaving it onto my car, solo, after every hunt got really tired. (There are good loading devices that can make that far easier, but I never got one.) They're also not fast boats: they're slugs, basically. That's the trade-off for the stability and capacity, I guess. It's not so bad that you couldn't paddle out to blinds 21/27 in 30 to 40 mins or so, but you'd definitely be sweating by the end. I did that all the time. (In the boat I've got now, a carbon fiber pack boat, I come in for lunch without thinking twice. It's a very different, but waaaay more expensive proposition.)
Also, they're definitely cheap boats, so the seat, for instance, takes some annual maintenance to ward off rust, etc. But for a cheap and versatile way to get out there, it was excellent. Good luck with your search. Kayak waterfowling, especially in early to mid-season, is highly underrated.
 

PlanB

Well-Known Member
Thanks everyone for the input. Sounds like the 12 is the way to go. Right now it will go in the back of a truck, so should be able to manage a heavier kayak. Down the road will likely have to huff it on top of a popup truck camper. Hopeing I’ll have an opportunity to try some out this spring, Covid permitting, before buying!
 

Tundra Swan

Well-Known Member
Hello Plan B,

My 12 foot kayak weighs 49 pounds but I still use a small boat trailer with a home made kayak bunk that sits below the regular boat bunk on the trailer for my 12 foot aluminum boat.

Jerome
 

paddle maker

Well-Known Member
I love my perseption overflow tjat veing said a 12 or even 15 foot canoe is way more versatile. You have plenty of space for decoys and a gun and a heater, plus you have the option standing up and punting through the marsh. I have abour a dozen different boars for different applications if i had to choose only one boat it would be a plastic 15 foot canoe
 

PlanB

Well-Known Member
I have been thinking of the old town canoe hybrid pictured below, light and lots of storage. I have a 15 foot canoe now that I use with a buddy drift hunting rivers for ducks and deer, also pictured below, I have added 70D008BC-0423-4ADE-82E7-A5D9578A3CA1.jpeg9DA492B5-8B72-4EFA-AE44-3107D07E1AA3.pngfolding seats front and back on my canoe. It’s great for 2 on the river as well as marsh hunting, it’s a pain to solo in especially on the river, that why I’m thinking the kayak would be great but am considering the hybrid.
 
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