Aluminum Boat Repair Near London?

stomp

Administrator
Staff member
A co-worker is looking to fix his leaky 14' aluminum boat. A previous thread included several recommendations for Ron Bankes. Is there anything closer to London?
 

bigdog

Well-Known Member
I have the same issue with my aluminun 12 footer.
I am thinking of taking it to a truck bed spray on liner guy, and having the bottom sprayed.

Bigdog
 

Wave Runner

Well-Known Member
I have the same issue with my aluminun 12 footer.
I am thinking of taking it to a truck bed spray on liner guy, and having the bottom sprayed.
You may want to rethink using bed liner as there are a host of problems associated with using it in boat applications. There's lots of nightmare testimonies regarding it's use on the boating websites.
 

bassaholic

Well-Known Member
Everything I've heard about the bedliner method is positive! Besides it costing a little much:eek:.....then again believe half of what you see and nothing of what you hear
 

HORTY

Well-Known Member
you can pick -up spray bombs from any auto parts supplier,if you just need seams sprayed ,tried on a friends a few yrs, worked great,an still no leaks
 

Wave Runner

Well-Known Member
You have my attention. What kind of problems/ issues?

Bigdog
The problem I've heard mostly is that bed liner was not designed for marine use or all the flexing that aluminum boats have therefore tend to crack. When that happens now you have a real problem with all that bed liner in the way trying to repair a new leak. They say it can be used on the inside but should never be used on the outside. It also adds considerable weight and causes extra drag due to it's rippled texture.

Gluvit is a marine waterproof epoxy sealer made exclusively for this purpose and is highly recommended over the use of bed liner on the boating sites. Rather than just a mere bandage fix it's curing is time delayed to allow time to actually seep into the rivets, seams and cracks sealing them permanently. It's incredibly strong and will flex without cracking.

http://www.marineoutfitters.ca/index.cfm?category=10060|10075|10695&product=23613848&code=Gluvit Qt
 

bassaholic

Well-Known Member
The problem I've heard mostly is that bed liner was not designed for marine use or all the flexing that aluminum boats have therefore tend to crack. When that happens now you have a real problem with all that bed liner in the way trying to repair a new leak. They say it can be used on the inside but should never be used on the outside. It also adds considerable weight and causes extra drag due to it's rippled texture.

Gluvit is a marine waterproof epoxy sealer made exclusively for this purpose and is highly recommended over the use of bed liner on the boating sites. Rather than just a mere bandage fix it's curing is time delayed to allow time to actually seep into the rivets, seams and cracks sealing them permanently. It's incredibly strong and will flex without cracking.

http://www.marineoutfitters.ca/index.cfm?category=10060|10075|10695&product=23613848&code=Gluvit Qt
I agree that the bedliner should not be applied to the underside of a boat hull however if you apply it to the inside it should have no adverse effects to the way the boat performs in the water. You seem to have done your research on this @Wave Runner!! If I were to buy another aluminum it will definitely be a welded!!!
 

Wave Runner

Well-Known Member
I agree that the bedliner should not be applied to the underside of a boat hull however if you apply it to the inside it should have no adverse effects to the way the boat performs in the water. You seem to have done your research on this @Wave Runner!! If I were to buy another aluminum it will definitely be a welded!!!
Bassaholic, I agree with your choice of a welded aluminum hull. That would also be my preference over another riveted hull even though I never had any leak issues with either Sylvan or Lund riveted hulls I've owned. But I never pound my boat in rough water like some do, my aging back says "don't do it!!!" :)

Other than open tinners most aluminum boats don't have easy access to apply bed liner on the inside of the hull which is another reason Gluvit is the better choice.
 

bigdog

Well-Known Member
Sorry about the incomplete post, seniors and smart phones are strange bedfellows. Our new phone is clearly smarter than we are!!!

I am not a boat or aluminum expert, but if welding construction is superorior to rivited why are aircraft still riveted construction?
Regards

Bigdog
 

Wave Runner

Well-Known Member
Good point @bigdog but I could ask why do ships no longer use riveted hulls like they did earlier in the 20th century? It's because welded hulls are stronger and they don't leak like a sieve like those old tubs always did.

We're not doubting the strength of riveted construction just that they are far more likely to develop leaks than welded hulls considering the countless places they could. :) Hey the senior thing... maybe I should pop a few rivets in to myself maybe I could leak a little easier some days. :LOL:
 
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bassaholic

Well-Known Member
Airplanes also don't take the constant pounding of waves every trip out. That is a lot of stress on a hull...especially if the operator doesn't ease up on the throttle while hitting those rollers :D
 

Josh Roelofsen

Well-Known Member
Riveted joints allow for an increased amount of flex at the joints whereas the welding process tends to somewhat weaken the joint and allows for much less flex. Personally I'd much rather replace the odd loose rivet than have a hull crack and require welding over a seam that was likely already a weld joint! And a word of advice....dont EVER buy a Tracker welded boat! Lol

Josh
 
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