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Ducks stew

Discussion in 'Waterfowling' started by lcooper, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. lcooper

    lcooper Well-Known Member

    I am making ducks stew, The ingredients are diced ducks, potatoes, carrots, parsnips, dumpling and beef stew seasoning mix. This is an old family recipe and it is an excellent stew. What you guys like to cook your ducks or geese?
     
  2. ship wrecked

    ship wrecked Well-Known Member

    I have made stew not bad..Fry with peppers onions garlic just don't over cook needs some pink in the meat. Made sausage to ,like to roast them up also.
     
  3. blackdog

    blackdog Well-Known Member Site Sponsor

    I like them cooked on a Webber BBQ with shag bark hickory soaked in water and placed on the coals. Cover and cook to your liking.:D
     
  4. binkley

    binkley Well-Known Member

    I enjoy slicing mine into strips and pan frying them in a red wine gravy with onions, galic, pepper, and ssalt and pouring it all over a bed of rice . very tasty treat indeed.[^]

    keepen'er afloat is always better than sinkin.
     
  5. Jello

    Jello Well-Known Member

    Whole skinned duck marinaded in wine vinegar, olive oil, rosemary, thyme, sea salt. Let marinade for a day. Allow to return to room temp and cook on rack pan at 450F. Mallard would take about 25mins (adjust for smaller ducks). Mind you, your duck will be medium-rare, so if you're squeamish about that, cook longer (but it'll dry out a bit if you do).
     
  6. Dicker

    Dicker Well-Known Member

    2 words
    Duck Poppers!!!!

    when hevi-shot's-a-flyin',alot-a-ducks-a-dyin'
     
  7. singlemalt

    singlemalt Well-Known Member

    I find there is no better way to use those less than ideal species like divers, gadwalls, et or freezer burned birds than Cajun Style Duck Gumbo. I kind of play with the recipe every time I do it and it is always good. However, to get you started try this recipe from the Delta Waterfowl website.

    www.deltawaterfowl.org/hunting/recipes/archive/014-gumbo.php
     
  8. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    "Less than ideal species like divers..."???!!! I'd take a Canvasback, Redhead, Ringneck, or Ruddy Duck, plucked and cooked as Blackdog outlined above, over one of those mud-ducks called Mallards any day!
     
  9. Old Cut LongPointer

    Old Cut LongPointer Well-Known Member

    Mud Ducks ? mmmmmmmmmm Not when you get them after they've been into the corn and there is an inch of nice yellow fat on them...Mud Ducks ? LoL !

    My Mom use to stuff an onion inside and wrap them in bacon if they wer not fat birds, I find stuffing them with quartered oranges and ginger keeps them very juicey. Nothing like a duck goulosh or gumbo when you want to spice it up !

    Has anybody deep-fried a duck ?
     
  10. ship wrecked

    ship wrecked Well-Known Member

    Oh I forgot my best recipe give them to someone that always bugs you for them. More often than not they won't bug you for more.[}:)]
     
  11. singlemalt

    singlemalt Well-Known Member

    Canvasback, one of the wonderful things about life is how different we all are. Good thing to or we would all wear the same coat drive the same car and be chasing the same woman. To each his own, I like to shoot divers and I eat all I shoot but when it comes to a fine meal give me a fat late season mallard or a woodie any day.
     
  12. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    Yes, Singlemalt, and it's also great that not all ducks taste the same. Anyway, found this in a story about market-hunting and thought that you might find it interesting re Canvasbacks and Mud-Ducks:

    "In 1873, New York City's Fulton Market posted these prices: Swans, $2; wild geese, 75 cents; canvasbacks, $1 a pair; mallards, 75 cents a pair; teal, 50 cents a pair; wild turkey, 15 cents a pound; deer legs, 11 cents; saddles, 18 cents; haunch, 20 cents." :D
     
  13. binkley

    binkley Well-Known Member

    well I have a lot more money invested in all of the above said items did you say you were willing to sell your stock for that John??????
    LOL. have a great day.;)

    keepen'er afloat is always better than sinkin.
     
  14. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    Here's from another article that also shows prices in today's dollars in parentheses. On a price/lb basis, Mud-Ducks are at the bottom ( except for Sky Carp, of course )8D

    http://www.theatlantic.com/food/archive/2010/12/ruddy-ducks-the-original-butterball-turkey/67472/

    "These are retail market prices for ducks taken from the Currituck Sound in North Carolina in 1884:

    • Pair of Canvasbacks: $1.00-2.75 ($64.83)
    • Pair of Redheads: $0.50-1.60 ($37.72)
    • Pair of Ruddy ducks: $0.25-0.90 ($21.22)
    • Canada Goose: $0.50 ($11.79)

    The price in parentheses is the modern price, adjusted for inflation. Astounding, isn't it? Also, no other species of waterfowl are listed. Then I found a 1901 restaurant menu cited in Appetite City: A Culinary History of New York from a place called Rector's that listed restaurant prices for a single cooked wild duck:

    • canvasback, $4 ($101.79)
    • redhead, $3 ($76.34)
    • mallard, $2.50 ($63.62)
    • ruddy duck, $2 ($50.89)
    • teal, $1.25 ($31.81)
     
  15. Old Cut LongPointer

    Old Cut LongPointer Well-Known Member

    Makes totol sense(cents ?)to me!I use to figure in an average year my cost per bird to be 50 bucks[approx.] My friends shake their head as to why I just don't go to the market and buy a nice plump duck that's ready for the oven,cost 8-9 bucks ? The Asian food stores will sell you a whole B B Q duck for 12 dollars!If I remember correctly a wise old proffessor sums it up best " Some understand without an explanation and others never will".
     
  16. duckman

    duckman Well-Known Member

    the market gunners most have been rich man that is wild
     
  17. archer

    archer Well-Known Member

    quote:
    Originally posted by singlemalt

    Canvasback, one of the wonderful things about life is how different we all are. Good thing to or we would all wear the same coat drive the same car and be chasing the same woman. To each his own, I like to shoot divers and I eat all I shoot but when it comes to a fine meal give me a fat late season mallard or a woodie any day.



    I prefer a canvasback or redhead over a mallard. Woodies are darn good eating but I have not shot one in a long time.

    Paul Meisenheimer
     
  18. Old Cut LongPointer

    Old Cut LongPointer Well-Known Member

    Those prices were what the hotel/restaruant charged....correct ? I don't think the poor bugger risking his life got paid a quarter of that ?
     
  19. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    The first set of prices were market prices, which I think were for plucked and cleaned birds, OCLP. So, the plucker/cleaner had been paid and the retail market would be making a profit, so I expect that the market hunter might have made 40-50% of the retail price. Note the range in price, which was probably based on how fat the bird was and on how badly it was or wasn't shot-up:

    "These are retail market prices for ducks taken from the Currituck Sound in North Carolina in 1884:

    • Pair of Canvasbacks: $1.00-2.75 ($64.83)
    • Pair of Redheads: $0.50-1.60 ($37.72)
    • Pair of Ruddy ducks: $0.25-0.90 ($21.22)
    • Canada Goose: $0.50 ($11.79)
     
  20. Buddy Boy

    Buddy Boy Well-Known Member

    Hello guys,

    I like mallards and blacks (same species) but I would take one canvasback over two of them in a heartbeat.

    I harvested a Ruddy Duck last fall ... it was not a pleasant meal.

    I have heard the term "sky carp" a few times ... what are they?

    Jerome

    PS:OCLP ... the saying is "For those who understand no explanation is needed and for those who do not none is possible".
     
  21. sonnyuphi

    sonnyuphi Well-Known Member

    A lot of hunters use the term "sky carp " to describe Canada Geese . I guess it's because like carp they are everywhere
     
  22. fshrgrl

    fshrgrl Well-Known Member

    what time's supper? pair it with a good bottle of pinot noir!
     
  23. Old Cut LongPointer

    Old Cut LongPointer Well-Known Member

    Thanks BB ! I stand corrected. My apologies to the good doctor for bastardizing his signiture qoute.
     
  24. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    Redheads and Pintails waiting to be cooked "hot and fast" on a Weber BBQ. Then it will be time to open a bottle of Fshrgrl's pinot noir and enjoy!

    [​IMG]
     
  25. archer

    archer Well-Known Member

    That looks good Dave!

    Paul Meisenheimer
     
  26. ship wrecked

    ship wrecked Well-Known Member

    Most of them are not shot up to.You must be a meat hunter.cheers
     
  27. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    As the saying goes "We're all descendents of successful hunters" and that probably refers to those who were good at putting meat on the table, which, ultimately, is why we hunt. Otherwise, why not just shoot clay pigeons? :D
     
  28. Buddy Boy

    Buddy Boy Well-Known Member

    Hello Dave,

    Nice birds ... who cleaned and plucked them?

    I fillet out the breast meat and the legs (on large ducks). I should try doing the whole bird again.

    Scott suggested that I use a slow cooker since I usually overcook them on a George Foreman grill.

    I have had poor success in cooking my ducks since my mother died ... edible ... yes ... tasty ... no!

    Jerome
     
  29. singlemalt

    singlemalt Well-Known Member

    I enjoy ducks lots of different ways from stew to BBQ. However I think my all time favourite is a whole plucked late season mallard or black pretty simply roasted hot and fast in the oven just until medium rare. It is very easy to blow this and overcook. I noticed that the DU Inc. (USA) magazine this fall (has a black lab with pintail in snow on cover) has a recipe very similar to the way I like it so I tried following it just before Christmas and the whole family agreed it was amongst the nicest meals of any type we ever served. I will certainly be doing it again.
     
  30. Duck Soup

    Duck Soup Well-Known Member

    I'll second that singlemalt. My only modification is that the same applies anytime to the following fat healthy ducks that can be cleanly plucked. Order of preference for me is 1) BW Teal 2) Mallard or Black 3)Canvasback or Redhead 4) Ringneck/Woody/GW Teal 5) Widgeon/Gadwall/Pintail. I find BW teal are almost always superior and the others can easily improve or fall off the chart depending on circumstances (what they were feeding on)
    quote:
    Originally posted by singlemalt

    I enjoy ducks lots of different ways from stew to BBQ. However I think my all time favourite is a whole plucked late season mallard or black pretty simply roasted hot and fast in the oven just until medium rare. It is very easy to blow this and overcook. I noticed that the DU Inc. (USA) magazine this fall (has a black lab with pintail in snow on cover) has a recipe very similar to the way I like it so I tried following it just before Christmas and the whole family agreed it was amongst the nicest meals of any type we ever served. I will certainly be doing it again.

     
  31. Pumper

    Pumper Member

    Old Hunter Recipe
    For a larger group of guys,par boil 8 to 10 or as many as you like duck breast,s then rinse and dice into bite size pieces,then place in roaster and add sliced onions,a couple of cans of mushrooms pieces or whole,it don,t matter then add assorted canned gravies example beef,chicken,mushroom then add half a bottle of red cooking wine.
    Roast in oven for about 3 hours and stir once in a while,serve with mashed or boiled potatoes.Enjoy.

    RON
     
  32. Pumper

    Pumper Member

    A favorite recipe of mine is Duck Fingers.Slice breasts into strips then bread them like you do chicken.Drop into deep fryer for 5 to 7 minutes,longer if you like well done.Dip in your favorite sauce.:p
     
  33. Buddy Boy

    Buddy Boy Well-Known Member

    Hello Singlemalt,

    I saw that recipe too ... looked good ... so I read it and added it to my file for future reference.

    It is called "Roasting Ducks" by Scott Leysath in the DU September/October 2010 issue (Vol 74, No 5, Page 44).

    Jerome
     
  34. singlemalt

    singlemalt Well-Known Member

    BB, that is the one. We had it again last night and it was delicious. The two mallard's breasts tasted and looked like very nice medium rare roast beef and the legs are wonderful. I had to fight to get one as my son ate three of them. I did cook the breast to a little higher internal temperature than Mr Leysath recommends. He suggests 145m I was more like 155.
     
  35. canvasbacksca

    canvasbacksca Well-Known Member

    Yep, SM, people who don't pluck and roast their ducks / geese have no idea that the legs are the best part!
     

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